Research

 

 

  • Washington For Good Policing assembled this data for the purpose of giving context and credibility to the preset data that is available. At this point in time neither the CDC nor the FBI track law enforcement fatalities. The three most reputable and comprehensive databases are — The Counted by the Guardian which provides data for 2015 and 2016, the Washington Post which is all law enforcement shootings in 2015 and 2016 respectively, and Fatal Encounters which is a volunteer, user-submission effort, but provides the most comprehensive database dating back to the year 2000— We are working behind the scenes compiling a comprehensive Washington State database that we will be releasing later this year.

 

Race 2016 Fatalities Per Capita Population
White 16 0.28 5,698,518
Black 3 1.07 278,360
Native 3 2.29 130,780
Asian/Pacific Islander 1 0.16 613,601

 

 

 

 

 —population by race from the 2010 census

  • The Guardian compiled US law enforcement shootings for 2015-2016 and adjusted race per capita:  In Washington State there have been 27 law enforcement fatalities in 2016 and 23 in 2015. These fatalities include shootings as well as death in custody, etc. The racial breakdown of the fatalities is as follows — Four black, six native, three asian/pacific islander, five hispanic/latino, 31 white, and one unknown (Shun Ma)

 Screen Shot 2017-01-06 at 8.00.18 AM.png Source: The Counted by Guardian as of 1.6.2017

  • According to Fatal Encounters there have been 447 law enforcement shooting victims in Washington State since the year 2000. The list is overwhelmingly male — white males leading the way in mostly domestic violence incidents, followed by Native Americans, and five African-Americans according to their data. In the past four years there have been a total of 124 law enforcement fatalities in Washington state, 2016 data reflecting a notable decrease:

    2016 2015 2014 2013 2012
             
             
    4 20 44 42 14

 

(this decrease is probably due to the Washington Post and The Guardians respective databases since Fatal Encounters is primarily based off of user submissions. It is also worth noting that due to the 2000 AP style-books color-blind guidelines for journalists resulted in many of the races between the years of 2000-2010 being marked as "unknown")

 

  • According to The Washington Post if you adjust per capita, black Americans are 2.5 times more likely to be shot and killed in a law enforcement shooting than their white counterparts. According to the Washington Post Database law enforcement in Washington State shot and killed 16 people in the year of 2015.  That number is 26 for the year of 2016.

  • According to the Gun Violence Archive there were 155 total shooting deaths in Washington State in the year 2016. The gun violence archive does not track law-enforcement shooting fatalities. If we take the 27 fatalities from the data compiled and cross-referenced by the Guardian's Counted, the Washington Post, and Fatal Encounters we actually had 182 shootings last year, and law enforcement shootings account for 14.8% of all gun violence homicides in 2016.
  • According to FiveThirtyEight Native Americans and African Americans have the highest law enforcement fatalities per capita than any other group — Native Americans were killed by police at a rate of 0.21 per 100,000 from 1999 to 2014, and African-Americans (who outnumber Native Americans roughly 10 to 1) were killed at a rate of 0.25 per 100,000.2 One hurdle when tracking Native-American fatalities is that many of these shootings occur on tribal land, and the tribes don’t have the bandwidth nor the resources to account for every shooting or public record request.

 

 

  • According to the International Business Times Washington State ranks 12th in the nation for law enforcement fatalities in 2016. Adjusted per capita Washington State is ranked 22 out of 51.

Screen Shot 2017-01-07 at 6.52.30 AM.png

           Source: The Counted by Guardian 

 

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